CISM

The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) team supports emergency response personnel. The focus is to reduce the harmful effects of managing emergencies, and to debrief emergency services personnel after an emergency. Confidentiality and respect for individuals are the highest priority for CISM. 

Purpose

CISM includes professional and volunteer responders from: 

  • Emergency services 
  • Medical community 
  • Mental health professionals.  

Members are trained in: 

  • Critical Incident Stress Debriefings (CISD) 
  • Aspects of acute trauma and disaster recovery  
  • Basic standards of peer support 

Besides CISD, the CISM program also provides: 

  • Post incident debriefing  

The CISM team is registered with the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation.  

Requirements

Prospective volunteers will be directed to an accredited training event and then invited to participate in ongoing training lead by the team coordinator. CISM members will mentor new members once they have received national accreditation. A certain amount of experience is required for the County Team. All team members must become registered volunteer emergency workers.

 

New members will: 

  • Complete an application and background check 
  • Have licenses and/or certifications verified (if applicable)
  • Complete an orientation (either in person or online)
  • Undergo an interview 

Limitations

CISM is not intended as a substitute for therapy. While some CISM members may be licensed therapists, they are not providing therapy in this role.  

Training

KCDEM holds quarterly in-person meetings for those interested in local CISM training and to review and evaluate recent activations.  Due to COVID-19, these training sessions have been on hold.  Check back for updates or email for more information. 

Why Volunteer?

A survey was recently sent to our volunteers asking them why they find it rewarding to donate their time. Some of their comments are below. [...]

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